The Still Mind

Our world observed from stillness


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The Mind and Health

buddhist monk in meditation pose over black background

Why is a clear and balanced mind so important? How do you achieve a clear and balanced mind?
Well, firstly, the importance lies in the mind’s command over the entire body. Before you do anything, you think about it first, then your mind (brain) allocates the bio-electrical resources to the appropriate muscles, thus they move, and move you in the direction you want to go.

This is what one’s life is all about. Your mind moving you to do what you want to do. The efficiency of this system is determined by the ability or inability of energy to move to where it needs to go. If the energy can flow freely, the system works fine. But if the energy is obstructed, the system can not operate efficiently. Thus inefficient energy movement births sickness, with symptoms that are treated with medicines. However, medications do not deal with the root cause which is an energy inefficiency, but rather deal with the elimination of the “complaint”.

What is energy inefficiency in the body? It is stuck and blocked emotional energy. So, how exactly Continue reading

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The “Silent Five” – Sitting With Your Self

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For those that live a hectic lifestyle (as is the norm for the majority of people today) it is very easy to wear the body out, and I’m sure that there is no shortage of worn out bodies walking around. There is something that is very important for the commander of your organism (you, in other words) to heed, and that is listening to your body. It’s harder for people now to listen to their body’s signals and accurately interpret them, due largely to the existence of, and ability to satisfy the heavily influential convenience drive, and the running “doing” of present human life. Yet, the body’s needs exist nonetheless, and it will come knocking when they are not met.

One of the greatest things that one can do for their body and mind, is to stop “doing” for a period of time, and release the control of the conscious mind to allow the “phantom operator” subconscious mind to come through and align the many components of the body and mind in harmonic orchestration. Thus, I dub this period of non-doing the “Silent Five”, where the only thing that is done is sitting, standing, lying, what have you, for at least five minutes, daily. The only activities that should remain are those that one can’t help doing (unless one wish not to continue the life of the body) such as breathing, pumping of the heart, having blood flow through vessels and so on. Just sit for these five minutes, eyes closed if you wish, or only slightly closed, it is up to how you feel, but having the eyes closed coaxes the mind to turn in more effectively. The thoughts will come, as they do, but it is okay, for that is the function of the brain in your head. As they arise, observe, acknowledge and let pass. Playing relaxing music may be helpful. Either way, the most important thing is to find what works best for you, in order for you to relax and simply be without stress.

This “time out” is something that everyone can use, and if you feel that five minutes is not enough, than listen to your body, and go for longer if you wish. Once you are in tune with your body, it will tell you when it has had enough of anything, and not just silent sitting.

The “Silent Five” can be done any time of day, but relaxing and meditative activities are usually best reserved for the morning hours and the period just before the body and mind are laid to rest. Additionally, the middle of the day is another optimal chunk of time, giving oneself a nice energy bust for the remainder of the day.

Just like with the relaxation exercise, be sure to take your “Silent Five” break when there are no distractions. It’s important to allow for uninterrupted “simmering” on your silent setting to enable things to adjust out appropriately.

Any questions or comments, feel free to contact me.

Happy silence ^_^

 

Related articles from The Still Mind

Zen Cooking – The Art of Mindful Practice

100 Benefits of Meditation

The Most Important Thing in Meditation: Relaxation

Still The Mind: How To


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Meditation and The Power of The Mind–Documentary

A very informative independent documentary that I stubbled across on meditation, delving into it’s history, practice, and the science behind it. I am attempting to encourage as many people as possible to start meditating if you have not already, and also support the perpetuation of this practice, for it is the greatest thing that one can do for themselves.
*If video does not load, follow this link to view: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-R3hb6Ha9A *


Feel free to leave a comment below, or I can be contacted via the various ways listed on my contact page
Enjoy! ^_^


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Abdominal Breathing

What is Abdominal Breathing?
It is safe to say that the majority of people are all familiar with the respiratory activity known as breathing. However, most carry it out constantly at less than perfect efficiency, leaving those that don’t know about enhanced ways of breathing, inhaling and exhaling at a considerably diminished capacity. Abdominal Breathing is actually not a new thing for your body. You’ve done it before; while you were still in the womb and for the early part of your childhood. The stomach would pump in and out to facilitate the exchange of blood and nutrients through the umbilical cord, as the lungs were still in development and also could not respire for lack of air. After you were born, the abdomen was largely instrumental in the breathing process, but later the chest took over, and breathing became shallow. Thus, Abdominal Breathing is also referred to as “Return to Childhood Breathing” as well as “Deep Breathing.” (Deep breathing can be done with the chest as well, however, a key difference is in the unique effects of abdominal breathing on the body, which I will discuss in the following post). It may seem counter-intuitive to most, for we know that the ribs and the chest in general are made to expand and contract with each inhalation and exhalation. However, for deep, fulfilling breathing to take place, the diaphragm must be brought into the equation. Continue reading